Kansas City Star

Kansas City Star Production Facility

In the mid-2000's, The Kansas City Star set about designing a building which would allow the public to view the inner workings of producing the morning news paper. The new production facility for the Kansas City Star hired The Austin Company , an engineering design firm specializing in large-scale industrial facilities, including industrial printing presses.

The result is a massive production building, where delivery trucks literally drive through the building at it's 16th street garage. The building is a state-of-the-art $199 million printing and distribution plant northeast of its main building at 1729 Grand Blvd. The windows span 3 stories, providing a well lit view at night of the paper being produced.

Photo of The Kansas City Star Production Facility

The Kansas City Star Production Facility.
Photo © A. Zahner Company.

Photo of The Kansas City Star Production Facility

The Kansas City Star Production Facility.
Photo © A. Zahner Company.

Photo of The Kansas City Star Production Facility

The Kansas City Star Production Facility.
Photo © A. Zahner Company.

Photo of The Kansas City Star Production Facility

The Kansas City Star Production Facility.
Photo © A. Zahner Company.

Photo of The Kansas City Star Production Facility

The Kansas City Star Production Facility.
Photo © A. Zahner Company.

Photo of The Kansas City Star Production Facility

The Kansas City Star Production Facility.
Photo © A. Zahner Company.

Zahner developed a preweathered copper patination system for this building which we fittingly call Star Blue™ Patina. An estimated 4155 pre-patina copper panels were installed on the building's surface to create the 80,000SF green-paneled surface area. The building's green surface is a mottled and variegated patina, designed to age the building's copper surface by 200 years. The natural patina will continue to grow and evolve and further protect the copper itself.

The wall system used was a modified Standing Seam Rain-Screen System, the root of which has been around for over 100 years. The modifications made were to the design of the visual line which is made at the seam emerging as a 45 degree angle and providing further rain-screen protection than a typical standing seam.

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