While worldwide demand for exceptional metal art and architecture is increasing, our headquarters has been feeling too small for our growing creative staff. Engineers from sales, research and development, product development, planning, advanced fabrication, and other disciplines are now collaborating in over 17,000 square feet of expansive space designed to encourage interactions inside while piquing the interest of those outside looking in.

We’re proud to share this first look at the new expansion we built to showcase our collaborative force and create a space we hope will inspire artists and architects to visit often.

Bill Zahner President & CEO, Zahner
Zahner Headquarters Expansion Inspires Collaboration

Crawford Architects designed the building’s exterior form, which is loosely based upon a common theme often seen in still life composition: the juxtaposition of three similar items. Three vertical ‘pods’, serving as a conference room and co-joined work spaces, rise directly east of the existing main building in homage to this classic tableau. Each pod melds into a gently sloped roof, sheltering the interior office area, which connects to a more traditional, box-like shop space for fabrication of special projects.  

Nine unique shapes comprise the zinc skin.
Nine unique shapes comprise the zinc skin.

The office portion of the building, along with each pod, is clad in amorphous zinc panels (9 unique shapes in total), lending a curious, scale-like texture to this portion of the structure. The shop area cladding is a more conventional insulated metal panel system. The result is a dichotomy of traditional and contemporary aesthetics.

Zahner Headquarters Expansion Inspires Collaboration

Still life composition inspired the building's exterior, but the interior is anything but static. The space is open, airy and visually dynamic – qualities meant to facilitate collaboration and interaction among shop and office employees alike. 

The feel of the space will inspire the creativity our team needs to turn our client's designs into reality.

Jim Mendenhall Production Engineer Manager, Zahner

A large wall of windows, spanning floor to ceiling, allows an unbroken visual connection between the office and shop areas, providing transparency—quite literally—into the full stack of the Zahner creative workflow.

Zahner headquarters expansion interior office with windows into the shop space
Zahner headquarters expansion interior office with windows into the shop space

The connection of the office and shop - in proximity and visibility - will encourage increased engagement between engineering and manufacturing, resulting in efficiencies we can pass on to our clients. 

Tom Zahner COO, Zahner
Video of meeting pod space in office

Natural light filters into the office area through three skylights atop each pod, a bank of windows on the west facing facade and a large-windowed curtain wall facing east. Clerestory windows on the north, west, and east elevations light the shop space.

Structural ribs, which form the building enclosure, are intentionally exposed inside the office area. These ribs, called ZEPPS, are part of the Zahner patented system for creating complex curved forms and are usually covered by material selected to form the building skin. In the new space, however, the ZEPPS are incorporated into the design aesthetic, undulating across the ceiling and down the walls. The space seems alive - moving and changing depending on one’s orientation within.

Custom designed tables by Matt Castilleja make durable (and beautiful) workspaces
Custom designed tables by Matt Castilleja make durable (and beautiful) workspaces
Custom wooden table detail
Custom wooden table detail

Employees share custom wooden work surfaces. Matt Castilleja, a Kansas City based furniture designer, hand-crafted each tabletop surface from 15 strips of Ash, Poplar, and White Oak. Zahner engineers collaborated with Castilleja to design and attach the metal bases. Introducing wood surfaces into the space further enhances the natural beauty of all materials used. 

I'm excited to work in a space I helped engineer and to see how working within it will lead to new perspectives. 

John Brennan Project Engineer, Zahner

Holistically, the new building is reflective of where Zahner is headed in 2018 and beyond. We will be encouraging our clients and colleagues in the art and design communities to visit often to learn, collaborate on projects, and be inspired. We hope you will find time to visit us in our new space in 2018! 



Zinc Zinc
Related Surface

Zinc

*Although we do not offer supply only sheets for unpatinated zinc, we are happy to custom fabricate based upon your project’s needs. We selectively partner with vendors offering the highest quality materials available in many sizes and thicknesses. Please call for details.Zinc has been in use as an architectural cladding material for many decades. Either in the commercially pure sheet form or as the ubiquitous coating on steel, typically referred to as galvanized steel. In its natural state, zinc is a bluish gray metal. In the commercially pure form, zinc is available in various sheet sizes, castings, and small cross-section extrusions. The mill surface is a bright, finlike appearance. It has a silver color. Mill-finish zinc quickly weathers to a dull blue-gray color as it develops zinc hydroxide over the surface. In most instances, the zinc hydroxide quickly forms a surface of zinc carbonate. Zinc carbonate offers excellent corrosion protection to the base metal. The pleasing color develops quickly in most exposures. Coastal exposures develop a chlorinated hydroxide with a slightly lighter cast.More often, zinc is used in the preweathered form. The preweathered surface is developed at the mill source. The surface arrives with a dull gray to greenish gray coating of zinc carbonate on both sides of the sheet. Zinc sheet is also available in black and gray-black colors. The colors are developed by oxidation processes and are successfully used in exterior applications. These flat, dark colors have very low reflective levels. They absorb heat like all black metals, so caution should be exercised when used where they are accessible to touching.Other colors are possible on zinc as well. Zinc is a reactive metal and accepts influences of chemical oxidation processes on the surfaces. Whites, pale yellows, and various tones of gray can be developed on zinc surfaces. The development of various patination colors on zinc are in their infancy as far as the architectural and ornamental industry.In the United States, zinc has experienced heavy competition from other gray-colored metals, such as lead-coated copper and terne-coated stainless. With growing concern for the environmental hazards posed by lead, its producers should be able to capitalize on the nontoxic nature of this metal. Runoff from zinc poses no hazard to the surrounding environment. Zinc and its natural oxides are nontoxic to human and plant life and can be handled without health risks."Zinc fever" is a major hazard, however, when the vapors of zinc oxide are produced and inhaled during welding or brazing operations. This illness is characterized by headache, chills, fever, and nausea and can be quite debilitating. The symptoms may be delayed 4 to 12 hours after exposure. Symptoms disappear upon intake of fresh air and rest. The illness usually lasts from 24 to 48 hours. Perform welding and soldering operations only in well-ventilated areas, with the use of respirator equipment. Cutting with plasma torches will also produce zinc oxide fumes. Avoid performing this operation in confined spaces. Use a respirator.Zinc is used in many ointments and lotions for protecting and treating topical ailments of the human body. Another name for the zinc oxide ore is calamine. The bug bite and poison ivy lotion with the same name contains zinc as an itch inhibitor. Zinc sulfate is used as an aspirant ingredient in many antiperspirants.Zinc is recyclable. Of zinc ingot, 5% to 10%%, is derived from recycled metal. This percentage should increase with time as more of the metal is recovered and recycled. Current scrap value of the metal is low. The metal's dull gray color makes it difficult to identify and distinguish from other scrap metals. As the value of scrap increases, the identification and separation of zinc from other metals will improve and so will recycling. Zinc refinement and casting processes use less energy than refining and casting operations for aluminum and copper. The low melting point of the metal will keep the recycling costs down in comparison with most other metals. Zinc uses lower amounts of energy during production and processing and produces less pollution than copper production.