The Guggenheim Canopy, designed by Frank Gehry Partners, is a Zahner-manufactured installation which was on view at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York City beginning in 2001. The artwork was erected for a Frank Gehry retrospective at the Museum in May-August, 2001. In addition to providing the canopy, Zahner also manufactured a number of mirror-polish stainless steel tables for the rooftop cafe.

The canopy artwork was manufactured using a titanium skin and aluminum structure. The form was made using ZEPPS, the Zahner-patented technology for building sculptural forms. This system was used to build the aluminum structure. The titanium was then clad over the aluminum substrate using a custom flat seam system.

The titanium's luminescent coloring was made possible by a thick layer of oxide on the metal surface. There are two distinct overlapping forms, and each is colored using a unique color of titanium-cladding made by varying the oxide thicknesses. This oxide process is called interference-coating, and can be used to create a range of iridescent colors on stainless steels and titanium surfaces. 

Guggenheim Canopy during its installation at the Guggenheim in NYC.
Guggenheim Canopy during its installation at the Guggenheim in NYC.
Detail of the two color tones used on the Guggenheim Canopy.
Detail of the two color tones used on the Guggenheim Canopy.
Guggenheim Canopy during its installation.
Guggenheim Canopy during its installation.
Guggenheim Canopy in NYC.
Guggenheim Canopy in NYC.
Stainless steel tables at Guggenheim.
Stainless steel tables at Guggenheim.
Guggenheim Canopy at the Zahner facility in Kansas City.
Guggenheim Canopy at the Zahner facility in Kansas City.
Structural bones of the Guggenheim Canopy.
Structural bones of the Guggenheim Canopy.
CAD image of the Guggenheim Canopy.
CAD image of the Guggenheim Canopy.