Studio Daniel Libeskind's First Private Residence

Designed by Studio Daniel Libeskind for a private client, 18.36.54 is clad in bronze interference-coated stainless steel. Design-engineered, fabricated, and installed by Zahner, the building skin is mirror finished to reflect the natural surroundings.

Combined with the complex angles of the home’s overall design, the finish exhibits a sense of visual unpredictability, changing with the landscape and lighting in unexpected ways.

The living space of this Connecticut residence is formed by a spiraling ribbon of 18 planes, defined by 36 points connected by 54 lines. This pure and dynamic architectural form generates distinctive interior spaces while dramatically framing both near and distant landscape scenes.

Daniel Libeskind Architect at Studio Libeskind
Detail of the Private Residence in Connecticut designed by Studio Daniel Libeskind.
Detail of the Private Residence in Connecticut designed by Studio Daniel Libeskind.
Interference Stainless Steel Interference Stainless Steel
Related Surface

Interference Stainless Steel

*Although we do not offer supply only sheets for light interference stainless steel, we are happy to custom fabricate based upon your project’s needs. We selectively partner with vendors offering the highest quality materials available in many sizes and thicknesses. Please call for details.Light Interference Coatings (LIC) on stainless steel provide a broad range of color which changes in various lights. From a deep blacks to bold bright colors, the light interference process brings a whole spectrum to stainless steel. The fine coating adds an aesthetic layer to the metal without sacrificing the innate high-performance qualities of stainless steel.There is no material in architectural use today that equals the iridescence produced by light interference on stainless steel. The effect is made by immersing the material in an acid bath, which forms a chromium oxide film layer on the surface. The acid bath produces interference colors by closely controlling the thickness of the chromium oxide film layer. This oxide film layer is clear, yet remarkable colors are produced by the physics of light interference.The colors generated are those obtainable by separation of the light spectrum. Light reflects off the dual surfaces, the surface of the metal and the surface of the oxide film. Depending on the thickness of the oxide film or the angle of the light reflecting back to the eye, different colors can be obtained. Portions of the light wave are enhanced in relation to other adjacent wavelengths, or portions are counteracted by the misalignment of these wavelengths.

Overhead view of the Connecticut residence, designed by Studio Daniel Libeskind.
Overhead view of the Connecticut residence, designed by Studio Daniel Libeskind.
The metal skin wraps the roof of the residence.
The metal skin wraps the roof of the residence.
Zahner Field Operator stands in front of the Residence in Connecticut designed by Studio Daniel Libeskind.
Zahner Field Operator stands in front of the Residence in Connecticut designed by Studio Daniel Libeskind.